Writing

Timezones and Statelines Zine Cover Art

Timezones & Statelines

November 17, 2006 • Format: 4.25″x7″ • 32 Pages

This issue is out-of-print and sold out.


Timezones and Statelines (aka Statelines and Timezones) is a split zine about long-distance friends and long-distance love that I wrote with Alex Wrekk (Brainscan, Stolen Sharpie Revolution) over Halloween week 2006 while Alex, from Portland OR, was visiting me in Chicagoland.

The title was loosely based on the lyrics from Defiance, OH’s song “Response to Griot” in which they sing: “if you call me up drunk at four in the morning/no matter the timezones or state lines away/I’ll be on buslines or burning up phone cards/just like I lived eight blocks away”.

At the time, Timezones and Statelines marked the first zine Alex Wrekk had made in nearly three years.

Contents

  • Spring (Alex Wrekk)
  • Summer (Alex Wrekk)
  • Autumn (Alex Wrekk)
  • Winter (Alex Wrekk)
  • Spring (Alan Lastufka)
  • Summer (Alan Lastufka)
  • Autumn (Alan Lastufka)
  • Winter (Alan Lastufka)

Reviews

“Intimate, complex, emotional—this split-zine made by the well-known Alex Wrekk and Alan Lastufka has a classic cut-and-paste look—it’s a very zine-y zine—and the text within reminds me of poetry in that it’s dense, elliptical, involves the reader deeply. I want to read it more than once. Themes are love, identity, and heartbreak, but always in concrete terms. Sometimes disorienting, in a good way. Reminds me of how it feels to be young and alive. More than the sum of its parts.”

– Laura-Marie, Zine World #25

“This split zine epitomizes the essence of “zine” for me–both visually and content-wise. Wrekk and Lastufka have each introduced and written exactly half of this zine, both writing seasonally based stories of love and proximity. Each person has dissected their stories into little cut-up blurts, arrayed over heavily collaged backdrops. Now that silk-screened covers and ultra-clean design seem to be so common amongst zine makers, the busy, loose style of this zine makes me nostalgic. The sparseness of the story details makes the frustration of these characters palpable, and it’s amplified through all the nervous night-time car conversations and waiting these people do…”

– Sarah Pinder, Broken Pencil #36

“Zine collaboration of the personal/emo sort from the creators of Brainscan and Pressed Between the Pages. Each editor writes four short stories correlating to the different seasons. I may have to use emo multiple times in this review, as that is the best word to describe the brief, disjointed writings within. Emo.”

Maximum RocknRoll #285

“This split zine project is the outcome of Alex’s (Brainscan and Stolen Sharpie Revolution) cross-country trip to Illinois to meet Alan (Pressed Between the Pages). Obvious masters of the cut + paste, this duo’s design aesthetic is solid, even if it isn’t the most innovative. With spreads separated into quadrants, each panel features a separate narrative intended to represent a different season. These panels are short and savory and have the effect of an Adrian Tomine comic. Timezones & Statelines contains snippets of human interaction but offers little exposition; consequently, readers never witness the climax. Like a series of denouements, the tension focuses on a lingering want that never seems satiated. Long goodbyes with this pair must be excruciating.” (VC)

Punk Planet

“A beautifully layed out cut & pasted project by Alan Lastufka of Fall of Autumn & Alex Wrekk of the zine Brainscan. Alan and Alex wrote this zine together after her cross country train excursion from Portland to Chicagoland to finally meet in person a fellow zine creator that had only been corresponded with from afar. I am glad they met and created this zine together. Timezones and Statelines is compiled of four different stories from each writer taking the reader on a trip through the four seasons. Each story is told with so much vision that it leaves your lips feeling as if they’ve just been kissed or your stomach feeling as it’s just been punched, even tho you realize you’ve just been laying in bed for the past 20 minutes reading, alone.”

– Richmond Zine Fest Distro

“Living half-way across a continent from one another didn’t keep these two zinesters from writing one of the best comp zines I’ve ever read. Writing about love both lost and found, each takes their own approach and owns half of this creative project. With unique voices and lives, these two tremendous writers have given their audience something to read and re-read until the pages fall apart!”

– shereviewszines.blogspot.com

“What is the difference between cleverness and gimmickery? Cleverness is a necessary invention while gimmickery is the invention of a necessity. The difference between brier rabbit’s tar baby and anything sold on QVC.

Timezones and Statelines, a split zine between Alan Lastufka and Alex Wrekk, employs two rarely successful tricks of split zines. The first is the excessively common flip-zine-over-in-the-middle layout schema where each zinester works toward the upside down end of the other zinester’s side. This is a sort of lazy collaborative technique that requires no interaction between the two sides. Each zine is independent of the other, aside from the fact that they are printed on opposite sides of the page.

This collaboration obstacle is further complicated by eight competing narratives cut into quarter page sections, each story linked by typography and graphic consistency. Each story is also thematically bound by the name of the season which serves as the backdrop metaphor of the piece.

These two layout devices, so dislocating in and of themselves, forge an integration of voice through cutnpaste dissonance. This zine is important because it exemplifies the full power and potential of the medium.

The writing is an odd mixture of straight story-telling, journal fragments, and the personal labyrinth of missing context confessions. Alan’s writing, more conventionally narrative, sinks into the graphic design of his page with such a natural ease, a sure sign of his pate natural zinester sensibility. Alex’s side has the warm familiarity of running into an old friend in the frozen food asile of a grocery store. Everything is distanced by time, erased by a sideways, wiley smile.

Timezones and Statelines restored my excitement and faith in the cleverness of zines and the inventive reality of their humble creators.”

– Love Bunni Press